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Thread: Wide boots

  1. #1
    Intermediate Snowatcher glen's Avatar
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    Default Wide boots

    does anyone know of any good intermediate to expert boot which is suited for slightly wider feet than normal, my feet usually get crushed with rental boots. Also would anyone recommend buying boots blind from america?

  2. #2
    Snowatch Owner & Snow Forecastor
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    Default Re: wide boots

    Would never recommend buying boots blind from anywhere. If you get sore feet you really need to have boots properly fitted if you want to stop the soreness. It's worth the time to get it done.
    Follow the Snow! snowatch.com.au

  3. #3
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    Default Re: wide boots

    I have extremly wide feet and was professionally fitted into Atomic boots. If you have even slightly abnormal feet it pays big time to get professionally fitted for boots.
    How many days till it snows again?

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    Snowatch Owner & Snow Forecastor
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    Default Re: wide boots

    Ofcourse getting new boots is expensive but how much do you rate comfort? If you get them fitted properly they should last for years.
    Follow the Snow! snowatch.com.au

  5. #5
    Ski Shop Owner & Equipment Specialist - Voted Best Boot fitter in Australia (SIA Australia Awards 2013) Paul Oberin's Avatar
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    Default Re: wide boots

    I assume you are talking ski boots rather than snowboard boots, if so boots can be stretched to make them wider where required, this is quite a normal thing to do.
    Most companies have a wide lasted boot in their range, other factors vary the fit such as instep height, how far the boot goes before it tapers in at the toe box, and ankle room, then there is the stiffness to suit your skiing style.
    Getting the shell size right is most important, if this is not done you are asking for trouble right away.
    As others have said, get them fitted right and you will have good boots for 150 to 200 days of skiing, get it done wrong and you will buy more boots every season or so and ski badly by comparrison until you get the right fit.
    Shop on fit, not on price, brand or colour.

  6. #6

    Default

    Speaking from experience i have several pairs of boots at home that were 'professionaly fitted' and still cained after a few hours skiing.

    I ended up biting the bullet and getting Larry to fit me into a set of Strolz last year, OMG they are so far from anything i have ever skied in before. Can go all day, every day on a week long trip and never suffer foot pain (except maybe getting into them in the morning if they are cold haha). Seems to be totally without compromise, no sliding around, no numbness, no sore shins, no banging into the toe box and awesome edge control.

    I have very, very wide feet and calfs though. Something to also remember is that as the shell gets blown out in the horizontal, it also becomes smaller in the vertical (i also have rather 'tall' (for lack of a better word) feet so this is an issue).

    Best of luck with your boot shopping!!

  7. #7
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    Default

    I wouldn't even dream of buying boots that weren't fitted by an experienced professional. And my foot isn't difficult to fit. My existing boots are probably nearing 200 days of skiing and it's time for new ones. Boots that fit you properly are an absolute must and regardless of what it costs, I sincerely doubt your will regret the dollars spent in the long run.

    A friend who spent years in rental boots got her own a couple of years ago and the improvement in her skiing was dramatic. At the end of the day, they cost a lot of money. But they actually fit her properly, she skis better and more confidently and actually makes it through a whole day without having to take breaks because of sore feet. She now gets more runs in for her lift ticket dollars. The boots will last her for years and she is saving on rental costs. Also, because they are the correct boot for her foot, she won't be buying a new pair in a couple of years because her feet still hurt.

    Her husband has difficult feet and a few years ago didn't take enough time and see an experienced boot fitter. He paid the price in both physical pain and the hip pocket when he forked out for a correctly fitted pair two years later.

    When you're ready to get boots, make an appointment and make sure you have plenty of time. If you let us know your location people around here should be able to give you some recommendations on where to go and who to see. Personally, I'd want to be seeing an 'experienced' fitter, not just whoever is working in the store on that day.
    Last edited by SnoWhite; 26-02-2010 at 08:30 AM.
    Skier: one who pays an arm and a leg for the opportunity to break them

  8. #8
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    Default Re: wide boots

    boots is one item I would never ever ever buy on-line!

    My last set I had fitted properly by a good ski boot fitter in sydney 9 years ago. I'm still using those boots and the extra cost all those years ago in getting properly fitted has more than paid for iteself. Its really worth the investment in time and funds IMHO.
    Winter is here!

  9. #9

    Default

    definatly take snoWhite's advice and make sure you make an appointment and see the better people in store. If you live in a city then they might even be open out of normal hours close to ski season and do their fitting then, much better as you get lots of attention and it is more relaxed as they are not as busy. The store that I went to even gave my bf a beverage to keep him amused while I had my boots fitted

  10. #10
    Snowatch Owner & Snow Forecastor
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    Default Re: Wide boots

    glen, what area do you live in? so we can recommend a 'good experienced' fitter.
    Follow the Snow! snowatch.com.au

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Oberin View Post
    This tells me you didn't go to a very good boot fitter after all, if you had any of those problems in a boot fitted by a professional fitter.
    Sore shins and banging in the toe box says you were fitted in a boot too big for your foot, numb toes indicate the same thing quite often as you are over tightening the buckles to take up space and this puts pressure on the Peroneal nerve sending your toes numb.
    Of course foam boots take the skill out of boot fitting, so all those problems are gone.



    Not the case if done right at the right temperature.

    "tall feet" most likely a "pes cavus" foot also requires a special foot bed, I hope you had that done by the right person otherwise pain will be ever present even in the right boot.
    The problems mentioned were evident in different boots, both purchased and hired. I did say i had several pairs at home gathering dust. The excuses by those that fit them were wide and varied, but all of them excuses (in one case i took them back atleast 5 times before i gave up).

    Even @ Adler, Larry had a hard time with my fitting something about the 2nd biggest calfs he had fitted along with an insanely wide foot (i wear 4E shoes and most don't fit as my foot is wider than the sole). I was right on the limit of fitting into the Strolz at all.

    As for taking the skill out of fitting, not really. There is still a great deal of work in the shell before the liner ever graces it.

    With regard to the buckles, never do i over tighten them!!

    All i can say, as per my first post and in answer to the original question was that i have never skied so well, or pain free as in the Strolz despite several attempts at 'professional boot fitting' and this is a fair statement based on my experience as a consumer. I am not naming names in a public forum, but PM me if you wanna know who fit what and what each of the specific problems were.

  12. #12
    Ski Shop Owner & Equipment Specialist - Voted Best Boot fitter in Australia (SIA Australia Awards 2013) Paul Oberin's Avatar
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    Default

    I fit boots and have for over 30 years, sure a shell has to be comfortable before it is foamed and sometimes the shell has to be worked to achieve this prior to foaming, but after that the foam takes up all the space and if the foot is aligned right and the shell is right, that is it.
    Foam is no where near the hard work normal boot fitting is, I have sold Stroltz boots in the past and I still sell plenty of foam liners, I love them as I don't have to do very much compared to a normal fit, where shells and liners have to be modified, often more than once.

    In the correct size boot you will not get shin bang or toes banging in the toe box, in the correct shape boot your toes won't go numb.

    For those with plenty of money, you can't beat a foam boot for a good fit, even in a snowboard boot.

  13. #13
    Ski Shop Owner & Equipment Specialist - Voted Best Boot fitter in Australia (SIA Australia Awards 2013) Paul Oberin's Avatar
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    Default

    Backs up what I have been saying, fitting boots without a foam liner is hard work and requires a lot of skill, not many can get it right, and those that do get it right have to work hard.

    It is so much easier to put people into a shell and take up the space with foam, very little skill required.

    The basics are, if a foam boot like a Stroltz or any brand is comfortable before the foam goes in, why shouldn't it still be comfortable when the foam fills the gaps around your foot.
    My only comment on the brand Stroltz is that the design of the shell is far behind other modern boots like Tecnica etc, but for the general skiing population they do the job, I would never buy a foam boot without a footbed, even if I thought I didn't need them, they can't be fitted later on in a foam.
    Being in a boot where your foot is the same length as the inside of the shell would be very painful even while trying it on in the shop, I doubt any person would buy a boot like that from me, people should buy boots from shops that offer a fit guarantee, you don't waste money that way on bad fitting boots.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Wide boots

    Pauls right, don't make the mistake I did. Make sure what ever boots you go with, that the place you buy from has a fit guarantee.
    Snow White, Ski Black!

  15. #15
    Intermediate Snowatcher glen's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The Frog View Post
    glen, what area do you live in? so we can recommend a 'good experienced' fitter.
    i live near hornsby.. from what i saw on the net, the store at west ryde looks decent

  16. #16
    karen97
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    Default Re: Wide boots

    See John at Alpsport. He is very knowledgeable! Or you could go down to Wodonga to see Paul.

  17. #17
    Podlettte
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    Default Re: Wide boots

    Or he could go to several other good fitters in Sydney.

  18. #18
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    Default

    Yep when buying boots try on the shells then get a good liner with custom foam and footbed. Even 'blind testing' I have found over the years that Atomics are always my choice for fit and performance (eg even neat fit, flex, forward lean, canting etc) for my version of Aussie feet (shoes, what are they?) - there is a boot out there!

  19. #19
    Ski Shop Owner & Equipment Specialist - Voted Best Boot fitter in Australia (SIA Australia Awards 2013) Paul Oberin's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by glen View Post
    i live near hornsby.. from what i saw on the net, the store at west ryde looks decent
    Do they offer a fit guarantee, if not go elsewhere, an decent fitter should be confident enough in their own abaility to offer this option.

  20. #20

    Default Re: Wide boots

    Alp sport does NOT offer a fit guarantee.
    Snow White, Ski Black!

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