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Thread: Thermals

  1. #41

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    Currently snotty nosed with a cold, but sung as a bug wearing one of my Icebreaker tops.... and it ain't ichy.
    zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

  2. #42
    Intermediate Snowatcher
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    wool undies won't help with that itch,Legless

  3. #43
    Off The Edge Ski & Surf - Penrith Mazza's Avatar
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    Dear Fellow snowatchers if I may put my 5c worth. It all comes down to choice, and how much you want to invest on a pair of Thermals.
    There are many popular brands on the market.
    As previously mentioned Wool is ok for warmth, but not so good if you are active and perspire a lot. Polypropelene is good allround fabric for wiking moisture and reducing smell, good thing about it is that you can give it a quick rinse and it will be dry in about half an hour. Brands that I sell at the shop include, Sherpa, Cross, Everwarm, Rip Curl (antibacterial) Quiksilver, and Roxy for the chicks that want a brand name [img]smile.gif[/img]
    As far as for layering, I recomend thermals top and bottom to wick moisture away from body, Fleece jumper for warmth top half, ski jacket and pants for the elements.
    Lets not forget the importance of a good beany, good socks and gloves, as 70% of body heat is lost through head, hands and feet.
    Look on the bright side, it's snowing somewhere in the world http://www.offtheedgeskiandsurf.com

  4. #44

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    ^^^ this is good advice!
    *insert witty comment here*

  5. #45

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    So basically wool is not good for wicking moisture/sweat? reading icebreaker website will have you believe otherwise, and anywhere where they talk about merino..i haven't had much luck re wicking sweat away wearing polypros

  6. #46

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    We wear skins definitely and as I don't do any form of exercise in the year except shopping, I have never ached in my first day of skiing after I discovered skins from Travelplan (way before they become popular). For tops, it is definitely Icebreaker but I bought my daughter one from Rojo and it is a mix of wool & ? and it is supposed to wick away the moisture better than just pure wool. As she's a child, it's hard to get an opinion from her.
    All said, if you wear 'good' ski suits, I don't think the moisture is a problem. I remember the snowboard pants from Rebel, cheap but you sweat in them and I am not those who sweat much. But my Spyder ski pants never give me that problem.
    So, all other factors must be taken into consideration when you get the opinions of the public- what ski suits they are wearing, breathable? waterproofable?, etc. So to ensure you have a comfy day, make sure your ski outfit is also breathable.

  7. #47
    Off The Edge Ski & Surf - Penrith Mazza's Avatar
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    Good call Honeybunny
    Good outer layers is a must
    Please read attached
    http://www.sherpa.com.au/shop.php?categoryId=2
    http://www.sherpa.com.au/shop.php?categoryId=3
    Look on the bright side, it's snowing somewhere in the world http://www.offtheedgeskiandsurf.com

  8. #48
    Gerr
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    Another 2 cents worth

    Layer 1 Skins
    Layer 2 Polyprop thermals
    If really cold - Layer 3 Polyprop Tracksuit pants and Top ( no zip or pockets)

    If you can afford them , skins are amazing - I never got sore legs or back once I started wearing them skiing. They are really good for the unfit!! Really helped with the fatigue over a week as well. Found I was less tired, little or no muscle soreness, etc.

  9. #49

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    Agree with you Gerr [img]smile.gif[/img]

  10. #50

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    Originally posted by aami:
    So basically wool is not good for wicking moisture/sweat? reading icebreaker website will have you believe otherwise, and anywhere where they talk about merino..i haven't had much luck re wicking sweat away wearing polypros
    Wool is OK for wicking sweat, but not as good as polyprop......never use cotton!
    *insert witty comment here*

  11. #51
    Extreme Snowatcher
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    i throw another 2c in the basket

    the polypro will dry fast with your body heat

    i'm assuming merino will dry, but not as quick as polypro

    and as JD has said don't use Cotton - it never drys
    Mad Respect

  12. #52
    Podlettte
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    Originally posted by John Deere:
    Merino Wool: The warmest but don't wick moisture as well so if your sweating in them you may end up colder due to being wet.

    I use Polypropolene when doing any sort of activity or when the temp is at risk of warming up and Merino in extreme cold temps or when not moving much (night time in the back country!)
    Wool actually still keeps you warm when it's wet, that's one of it's advantages.

  13. #53

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    Well, thats a bit misleading, wet wool still contains insulating properties but nothing like when it is dry! Best not to use it if you sweat alot or when hiking up Watsons Creek
    *insert witty comment here*

  14. #54
    Legolas
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    ordered my skins as recommended by skijak... [img]graemlins/woohoo.gif[/img]

    my legs hurt now after todays gym session. Wish I had them now

    [size="1"][ 05.06.2008, 11:51 PM: Message edited by: Legolas ][/size]

  15. #55
    TB
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    Know what you mean, started my Rock climbing course today (sans skins). Already sore-tomorrow will ****

  16. #56
    Advanced Snowatcher
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    i'd like to also recommend Sherpa polypropylene thermals, i have the uppers and the longs, and they are fantastic, wicks away sweat, dont really smell at all and keeps me very warm.
    here is a link:
    http://www.sherpa.com.au/shop.php?categoryId=2

  17. #57
    Advanced Snowatcher
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    oh yeah one mor thing this is waht sherpa say about the two type of material:
    http://www.sherpa.com.au/fabric_comparison.php

  18. #58
    Podlettte
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    Originally posted by John Deere:
    Well, thats a bit misleading, wet wool still contains insulating properties but nothing like when it is dry! Best not to use it if you sweat alot or when hiking up Watsons Creek
    I didn't say they were the same as when dry, you really need reading lessons [img]tongue.gif[/img]

    Wet wool will keep you warmer than wet polypro or other synthetic.

    I may not have done BC stuff with wool thermals, but I sure as hell have enough experience with them to be able to speak up about it

  19. #59

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    It's a hair split, you never qualified your statement one way or the other and it is entirely reasonable to assume you meant "as warm as" which is why I said your statement was a bit misleading.

    Anywho......

    Polypro dries fast enoughj that your often dry before you can get cold.....wool doesn't!

    It is my considered opinion that when doing strenuous activity involving sweating profusely, you may be briefly warmer when you stop in wool than in Polypro however, half an hour later you will be dry and warm in the polypro and at a bit chilly in the wool!

    Feel free to ignore this opinion, however I do encourage you to try both so that when you report back I can say I told you so
    *insert witty comment here*

  20. #60
    snowman
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    polypro for sure, they dry so fast .........even when hiking hard.

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